Internet dating names women

01-Sep-2017 04:06

As was the case then, this survey finds that two types of harassing behavior are especially widespread.

About a quarter of American adults (27%) say they have been called offensive names online – up 4 percentage points from 2014 – while 22% say that someone online has tried to purposefully embarrass them.

Smaller – though still notable – shares of Americans have encountered more pernicious forms of harassment. adults have experienced one or more of these “severe” behaviors online.

One-in-ten have had physical threats directed at them online, while 7% each have encountered sustained harassment or stalking, and 6% have been sexually harassed. To be sure, these more serious behaviors are not isolated from name-calling and embarrassment: 72% of those who have experienced these more serious types of harassment have also been called offensive names or purposefully embarrassed.

All have been trolled or harassed to varying extents.

There’s usually more of a sexual component when the targets are women, like rape threats and such, but I’ve seen men threatened with physical violence, too.

Men are somewhat more likely to be called offensive names (30% vs.

23%) and to receive physical threats online (12% vs.

One-quarter (25%) have received physical threats online, while smaller but still notable proportions have been sexually harassed (15%), harassed for a sustained period of time (16%) or stalked (13%) online.While these experiences can certainly be troubling, those whose encounters with harassment are limited to these behaviors generally find them to be a tolerable nuisance of life online.Throughout this report, the 22% of adults who have experienced name-calling or efforts to embarrass them – and none of the other four experiences measured in the survey – are referred to as targets of “less severe” forms of online harassment.Further, this report distinguishes between “more severe” and “less severe” forms of online harassment.Those who have only experienced name-calling or efforts to embarrass them are categorized in the “less severe” group, while those who have experienced any stalking, physical threats, sustained harassment or sexual harassment are categorized in the “more severe” group.

One-quarter (25%) have received physical threats online, while smaller but still notable proportions have been sexually harassed (15%), harassed for a sustained period of time (16%) or stalked (13%) online.While these experiences can certainly be troubling, those whose encounters with harassment are limited to these behaviors generally find them to be a tolerable nuisance of life online.Throughout this report, the 22% of adults who have experienced name-calling or efforts to embarrass them – and none of the other four experiences measured in the survey – are referred to as targets of “less severe” forms of online harassment.Further, this report distinguishes between “more severe” and “less severe” forms of online harassment.Those who have only experienced name-calling or efforts to embarrass them are categorized in the “less severe” group, while those who have experienced any stalking, physical threats, sustained harassment or sexual harassment are categorized in the “more severe” group.Many Americans have experienced harassing behavior online, but harassment is an especially common fact of online life for younger adults.